Whiz Kid
 
Flies With a Story
 

The Flytier:

Story By: Mike Flagg, aka "Mike MT"
Fly Designed By: Mark Bauman
Finished Fly Tied By: Mike Flagg
Mike's Home: Kalispell, MT

E-mail: 6flaggs@in-tch.com

Mike is a Holistic Healthcare Practitioner living, working...and fishing in Kalispell, Montana.

 

The Fly:

whizkid-300.jpg

Hook: Nymph or dry-fly hook depending on presentation desired, sizes 8 to 18.

Thread: 3/0 or 6/0, depending on hook size, color to match or contrast.

Trailing Shuck: 3 Peacock herls extending approximately the length of the hook shank.

Body: (As shown in the photo below.) Measure a small bunch of deer hair about twice the length of the hook shank (I like it 1.5x, but Mark tied it 2x).  The bobbin should be at the rear of the shank with the thread hanging through the midpoint between the hook point and barb.  Lay the hair along the top of the shank so that the extra length and tips point forward and past the hook eye.  Cinch down the hair with a few thread wraps. Next, hold back the tips briefly so you can wind the thread forward to the eye. With the thread hanging just behind the eye, pull the hair forward and over the eye again, and cinch down the hair with a few thread wraps.  Tied this way there should be a bouyant "bubble" of deer hair between the two sets of thread wraps. The deer hair tips should extend forward and be long enough to form a bullet head.

Butt: To form the butt, simply cut the butt ends off the deer hair so that it is a little rough. 

Hook:
Nymph or dry-fly hook depending on presentation desired, sizes 8 to 18.

Thread: 3/0 or 6/0, depending on hook size, color to match or contrast.

Trailing Shuck: 3 Peacock herls extending approximately the length of the hook shank.

Body: (As shown in the photo below.) Measure a small bunch of deer hair about twice the length of the hook shank (I like it 1.5x, but Mark tied it 2x).  The bobbin should be at the rear of the shank with the thread hanging through the midpoint between the hook point and barb.  Lay the hair along the top of the shank so that the extra length and tips point forward and past the hook eye.  Cinch down the hair with a few thread wraps. Next, hold back the tips briefly so you can wind the thread forward to the eye. With the thread hanging just behind the eye, pull the hair forward and over the eye again, and cinch down the hair with a few thread wraps.  Tied this way there should be a bouyant "bubble" of deer hair between the two sets of thread wraps. The deer hair tips should extend forward and be long enough to form a bullet head.

Butt: To form the butt, simply cut the butt ends off the deer hair so that it is a little rough. 
 

whizkid-step1-200.jpg
Peter's Note: This photo and the one  that follows below show my first attempt at Mike's recipe, and is the reason
I forgot the peacock herl tail. Though a bit rough, the above shows the appearance of the body,
after the butt is trimmed and before the bullet head is formed.

Head: Return the tying thread to the 1/4 point.  Fold hair back and create a bullet head by tying the hair down and finishing with a whip knot.  I like to use an attractor colored thread for this purpose, such as orange or red. Some tiers like to coat the head with flexible cement to add durability.

whizkid-step2-200.jpg


Additional thoughts:  The Whiz Kid can be tied in any color imaginable. I've also tied some with rubber legs, but haven't had a chance to fish them yet. The standard imitation fished dry certainly looks like a caddis, but it can be taken for an emerging mayfly, even a terrestrial. A small piece of bright poly-yarn can be tied in for an indicator, if desired. Add a split shot or two to your tippet and fish the Whiz Kid wet; it has a beautiful pulsating "I'm alive, come eat me" movement that triggers fish to feed. The sky is the limit on this one, so experiment and have fun.

Fly origin: The Whiz Kid was the brainchild of my friend, Mark Bauman of Whitefish, Montana. Sadly, Mark passed away in September, 2002. His tying talent, fishing expertise, teaching patience, and friendship will be sorely missed.


The Story:

"... I fished that one size 14 Whiz Kid the entire day...."

Very early one June morning a couple years back I headed off to my favorite river. Really, it's nothing more than a glorified stream, but the fishing is great...and the solitude is even better.

I got to my favorite stretch, suited up, and waited impatiently for daylight. I had decided before I left the house that I would be use a new fly designed by my friend, Mark Bauman, of Whitefish, MT. It was called the Whiz Kid. Mark told me to use it in size 10, but I nevertheless tied one each of sizes 10 to 18...just in case.

As the sun came up, I could see fish working the shallows. They must be on caddis emergers, I thought. Carefully I tied on the middle-sized Whiz Kid, a size 14, and made my first cast. Slowly, silently, and in what appeared slow motion, the 5x tippet uncoiled and the fly landed ever so gently on an overhanging bush. Sigh. Being my only size 14, I wasn't about to lose it on the first cast of the day, so I waded over, undoubtedly putting down every fish in the hole, and released the bush.

I promptly proceeded to the next hole hoping the day would improve. It did. I released at least fifteen 14"-16" rainbows (and only the one bush!) that day.

The amazing thing about the Whiz Kid is its tremendous versatility. In the morning the fish were caught on the surface; during the midday hours they were caught while stripping the Whiz Kid near the bottom; and in the evening they hit it on the swing or while being skated. I fished that one size 14 Whiz Kid the entire day, and it was still in good shape when I went home! Now that's what I call a killer fly!

 -- Mike Flagg

 

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